iHealth Track Blood Pressure Monitor REVIEW | MacSources

MacSources
8 min readApr 16, 2021

Easy tech to keep the Silent Killer from sneaking up on you.

Technology has improved the ability of patients and doctors to optimize health. Patients can connect with apps like My Fitness Pal, Lose It, and monitor energy/food/intake. They can connect with various sensors for glucose control, oxygen, blood pressure, weight, and other biometrics. Some of these sensors have been embedded into clothing, while others into shoes, into gloves, into large exercise machines, rings/pillows, etc. Despite the technology, many still lack control of their diet and live sedentary, smoke-filled, gluttonous lifestyles. With an overabundance of salts, fats, and calories, our population has become obese. According to the CDC, 42.4% of Americans were obese in the year 2018. With the obesity pandemic, our people experience increased risks for heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, organ disease, diabetes, certain cancers, and possibly early death. Maybe it’s time we put our sensors and tech to work! With devices like the iHealth Track BP monitor, you can be the Author of your Own Health. It’s time to get off of your keester and move for a better you.

The iHealth Track Connected Pressure Monitor arrived in a clean appearing 6 1/4 inches wide by 6 3/8 inches tall by 3 5/8 inches thick retail case. Like many Apple accessories, the company utilized colorful imagery atop a sterile white background. The cover panel listed the “iHealth Track” name along the top of the cover panel, followed by a generic “Connected Blood Pressure Monitor” name, an image of an iPad/iPhone along the bottom left, and a Clinically Validated icon along the bottom right. Despite the emergency cone orange title, the main focus remained the obliquely angled image of the iHealth Track monitor. I loved the green LCD, the crisp number display, the grey font, the contrast between the white monitor and the white background color, the lower shadowing, and the little Bluetooth icon. Intelligently, the company continued the same vibrant color scheme throughout the other panels. The top panel provided a trilingual description of the simple three-step instruction process. Simply measure your blood pressure, see and sync the result, and then share with your doctor. The panel’s lower edge provided a QR code, Apple App Store/Google Play Store icons, and instructions to scan to install the iHealth App. Like the cover, the top panel’s midsection displayed attractive imagery of the monitor/BP…

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